Good news. The permitted development rules have recently been relaxed (July 2020), allowing you to build an extension without planning permission of up to six metres (or eight metres if your house is detached).

IS YOUR PROPERTY LISTED OR ON ‘DESIGNATED LAND?’

Or other ‘protected’ areas, including Conservation Areas, National Parks, areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the Norfolk or Suffolk Broads or a World Heritage Site? Your permitted development rights might even have been removed if there is an ‘Article 4’ direction for your property.

Hopefully, it may only be the case that your permitted development rights have been restricted on designated land, meaning you cannot:

  • build more than one storey;
  • build a side extension;
  • or clad the exterior.

PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RULES APPLICABLE TO ALL EXTENSIONS

  1. Materials to be similar to the existing house
  2. No verandas, balconies or raised platforms
  3. Must not be taller than the existing house
  4. The extension(s) should not take up more than half of the garden/outdoor space
  5. A single storey extension can’t be more than four metres high. If the extension is within two metres of the property’s boundary, it can’t be more than three metres high.

PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR FRONT EXTENSIONS

Not allowed under permitted development rules, but you can still apply for planning permission.

PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR SIDE EXTENSIONS

  1. Must not front onto the road
  2. Single storey only
  3. Maximum of three metres out from the original house
  4. Must not be more than half the width of the original house

PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR SINGLE-STORY REAR EXTENSIONS

Under the relaxed rules, you can extend up to eight metres for detached houses and six metres for all other houses. Please note that for these larger extensions (beyond four and three metres respectively) you will need to give notification under the Neighbour Consultation Scheme. If you get any objections, you may not be able to build a larger extension.

PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR DOUBLE-STORY REAR EXTENSIONS

  1. Double storey extensions can extend up to three metres out from the original house.
  2. Must be no closer than seven metres to the rear boundary.
  3. Roof pitch to match existing house.
  4. Upper-floor, side-facing windows to be obscure-glazed; any opening to be 1.7m above the floor.

LOFT CONVERSIONS

Planning permission is not normally required. However, permission is required where you extend or alter the roof space and it exceeds specified limits and conditions.

A loft conversion for your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, subject to the following limits and conditions:

  • A volume allowance of 40 cubic metres additional roof space for terraced houses*
  • A volume allowance of 50 cubic metres additional roof space for detached and semi-detached houses*
  • No extension beyond the plane of the existing roof slope of the principal elevation that fronts the highway
  • No extension to be higher than the highest part of the roof
  • Materials to be similar in appearance to the existing house
  • No verandas, balconies or raised platforms
  • Side-facing windows to be obscure-glazed; any opening to be 1.7m above the floor
  • Roof extensions not to be permitted development in designated areas**
  • Roof extensions, apart from hip to gable ones, to be set back, as far as practicable, at least 20cm from the original eaves
  • The roof enlargement cannot overhang the outer face of the wall of the original house.

GARAGE CONVERSION

Planning permission is not usually required, providing the work is internal and does not involve enlarging the building.

If your intention is to convert a garage into a separate house (regardless of who will occupy it), then planning permission may be required no matter what work is involved. We advise that you discuss such proposals with your local planning authority to ensure that any work you do is lawful and correctly permissioned.

Sometimes permitted development rights have been removed from some properties with regard to garage conversions and therefore you should contact your local planning authority before proceeding, particularly if you live on a new housing development or in a conservation area.

Where work is proposed to a listed building, listed building consent may be required.

For further information or advice, contact us here: https://www.cadenconstruction.co.uk/contact/